Engaging Faith: Practical lesson ideas and activities for Catholic Educators

December 5, 2008

Facebook and God's Kingdom

Classmate 1:So I was in my spinning class and "Another One Bites the Dust" comes on. When I hear that song I think of the tape that you and your brother did and sent to [Name] and me. Do you remember that? We were pretty cruel to each other back then.

Classmate 2:I don't remember making a tape and why "Another One Bites the Dust." You will have to remind me. Are you sure it was me? I remember waking up at 5am to call you to wake you up. Do you remember that? Why I had to call you I don't remember?

I was reading the "wall-to-wall" conversation (above) between two former students of mine (also my "friends" on Facebook) when I realized that today's Facebook generation is getting a little taste of what Purgatory and Heaven are like all wrapped into one.

In other generations, sins of childhood could be more easily forgotten and stored away. Maybe not now. Instead, many years removed, we could meet up with someone we offended years ago. Taking a positive outlook, what a good opportunity to offer forgiveness and perhaps satisfaction for a long ago hurtful action.

Regarding Heaven, don't we believe that we will be reunited with all the friends and family members from our life on earth? Things like "classmate search" and "recommendations for friends" through websites like Facebook allow people to form an Internet community not separated by space or time with people from all throughout their lives.

Talk over some of these "Facebook issues" with your students. Ask them what they think about:

Does knowing your high school classmates will be able to stay in touch with you well into the future affect how you treat them now?

How do you feel when someone you have not seen for years contacts you on Facebook?

* How does your "Facebook community" feel like a glimpse of the God's Kingdom?

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