Engaging Faith: Practical lesson ideas and activities for Catholic Educators

October 13, 2017

Helping Students Discover the Roots of Faith

Here are two activities you can do with your students to help them to critique their own faith history and better answer the question “Why do I believe in Jesus”?

In Class

Help students reflect on their most strongly held beliefs about Jesus.  Begin by inviting students to make a quick list of every person or source from which they have learned something about Jesus.  Then, setting this first list aside, challenge them to list the twenty most important things they believe about Jesus. At this point, you might even offer them time to compare lists with a classmate and revise as they feel necessary, based on new ideas from their discussions. Once they feel confident about their lists of twenty, have them evaluate which ten of the twenty are the most important. Finally, have them evaluate which three of those ten are the very most important. Direct them to look back at their lists of sources of information that they first brainstormed, and pose the question:  Which of these teachers or sources have contributed to your top three beliefs? Students may find that their most closely held beliefs were those influenced by the largest number of teachers, or conversely, by those teachers whose relationship or example they value most. Discuss student reactions to the exercise as a class.

At Home

Have students interview a faith mentor. Invite students to spend time talking with someone who has helped shape their faith—perhaps a parent or other relative, a friend, a teacher, or a Church leader.  Students should ask their mentors who they believe Jesus is and for what reasons they believe in his divine nature.  They should report back about their interviews, using a format of their choosing.  If time allows, students might, for instance, create a poster, a video, a written reflection, a prayer service, or any other creative “product” that shares the wisdom of their faith mentor with others.

Leave a Comment

High School eNewsletter
Receive bi-weekly lessons, links, tips and more in our Email Newsletter

Resources Archive